Filo Table Lamp

$550.00
Designed by:  Andrea Anastasio
Manufactured by:  Foscarini

Filo comes from the desire to display the individual parts that go into a lamp - the light source, decoration and electrical wiring - bringing out their structural and aesthetic characteristics, simplifying the grammar and syntax.  Its essential character is the result of the choice of using decoration to play a fundamental role, incorporating elements that are not traditionally considered decorative.  Hence the electrical wire establishes a dialogue with the parts in glass and the diffuser, in a rhythmical game of role swapping.  While the energy that allows the lamp to perform its purpose as lighting runs along the cord, spheres and bulbs of glass also take their place there, transforming it into the archetype of a necklace, with a porcelain body in the form of a cone that projects the light on the wire and the glass spheres, ideally positioned as a pendent.  A wide range of colors enlivens the lamp with multiple identities, from watercolor tones to the transparent hues of Murano glass, bright colors with ethnic overtones to the fluorescent tones of contemporary cityscapes, making it possible to insert the lamp in a very wide range of settings. Manufactured by Foscarini.

Filo requires one LED retrofit 4W G9 3000K 400 lm CRI>80 bulb.  Light bulb not included.

Designed in 2017.

8" Diameter, 22.9" H

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Foscarini Filo Table Lamp
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Designed by:  Andrea Anastasio
Manufactured by:  Foscarini

Filo comes from the desire to display the individual parts that go into a lamp - the light source, decoration and electrical wiring - bringing out their structural and aesthetic characteristics, simplifying the grammar and syntax.  Its essential character is the result of the choice of using decoration to play a fundamental role, incorporating elements that are not traditionally considered decorative.  Hence the electrical wire establishes a dialogue with the parts in glass and the diffuser, in a rhythmical game of role swapping.  While the energy that allows the lamp to perform its purpose as lighting runs along the cord, spheres and bulbs of glass also take their place there, transforming it into the archetype of a necklace, with a porcelain body in the form of a cone that projects the light on the wire and the glass spheres, ideally positioned as a pendent.  A wide range of colors enlivens the lamp with multiple identities, from watercolor tones to the transparent hues of Murano glass, bright colors with ethnic overtones to the fluorescent tones of contemporary cityscapes, making it possible to insert the lamp in a very wide range of settings. Manufactured by Foscarini.

Filo requires one LED retrofit 4W G9 3000K 400 lm CRI>80 bulb.  Light bulb not included.

Designed in 2017.

8" Diameter, 22.9" H

Foscarini

Foscarini was founded in 1981 on the Italian island of Murano near Venice. Given its location, its early production pieces were logically focused primarily on blown glass. By the late 1980s, Carlo Urbinati and Alessandro Vecchiat (both had previously worked as designers for Foscarini) took over management of the company and expanded its mission to include research and experimentation in a range of materials other than glass – molded polyethelyene, aluminum, polycarbonate, even Kevlar thread and silicon-coated metal. This commitment to innovation through materials has led to successful collaborations with a number of renowned architects and designers over the past few decades including Ferruccio Laviani, Tom Dixon, Aldo Cibic, Piero Lissoni, Marc Sadler, James Irvine, Karim Rashid, Patricia Urquiola, Luca Nichetto, and Valerio Bottin. Foscarini has received numerous, prestigious awards and many of its designs are now in the permanent collections of several museums around the world.

Andrea Anastasio

Andrea Anastasio (born 1961 in Rome, Italy) completed his studies in philosophy and embarked upon a cultural path that led him to cooperate on projects entailing the cataloguing of Islamic architecture in India, research on innovation in traditional craftsmanship techniques, partnerships with architectural practices, publishers, and museums. Fascinated by the study of the poetics of conceptual art and its potential convergences with industrial design, he designs furniture and objects for several Italian companies.